Of Cones and Toes

Patrick enjoyed a routine visit to the Cardiologist this afternoon {“enjoyed” may not be the right word…but he was fairly brave and tried to curb his indignation, tears, and requests to “go back to the gold car.”}

P’s troublesome ticker looks pretty much the same as it did in July. While there is no imminent danger, we will need to do something {in coming years} to reduce the amount of blood that regurgitates into the atrium–enlarging the right side of his heart. Dr Rhee feels that a surgical procedure called a cone repair will do the trick. The idea is to move the three leaflets of the tricuspid valve up where they should be and reshape them into a cone.

Before doing a cone repair, the surgeon(s) will probably want Patrick to get older/bigger. In the meantime, they will call us in soon to do a study on his heart to see if he still has electrical pathways in his heart that could cause SVT (rapid heart rhythms). If SVT is still a potential problem, then they’ll do a low-risk catheter ablation to get rid of the SVT pathways. Both the study and the cath procedure would just be overnight procedures (so that they can monitor him after he’s been under anesthesia).

In other news, we are loving our new house (will share photos in the near future) and getting excited to meet the soon-to-be fourth member of our family. My due date is May 1 and so far the baby is healthy and whole. We had a fetal echo done in January to take a close look at his heart–it looked totally normal. The only item of not was that Patrick’s baby brother has 12 toes! The better to kick me  with, of course…

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Steady as He Grows

Patrick had a cardiology check-up yesterday and Dr. Rhee said that while his heart is still enlarged, it has not become any worse. If his heart stays as it is, he may not require any future open-heart interventions!

It is likely that P will need a couple of less-invasive procedures in the cath lab (one to test the electrical pathways again and make sure he’s not in danger of an arrhythmia, and one to further close his ASD). But we can handle quick over-nighters at the hospital for these types of procedures. We’re so grateful things are holding steady!

I would upload a photo of P wearing nothing but a diaper, hospital anklet, and sandals in the exam room (playing with cars of course). But I don’t have my phone  (which contains the photos)with me, so instead here’s one that Braden took on Monday (also with cars). You’ll just have to imagine that you can see his pot-belly and chicken legs ♥

Patrick Burrito

Sometimes Patrick’s love for his blanket combined with his love for perpetual motion results in a Patrick Burrito…

Note the heart monitor sticker peaking out of his onesie. Yeah, there was supposed to be a sensor thingy attached to that sticker, but those often came unattached for some reason. I’m sure that you can’t imagine what the reason was.

The cardiologists had Patrick on an Ambulatory Cardiac Telemetry (ACT) Monitor for 21 days so that they could make sure that his heart rhythmn is healthy now that the amiodarone has cleared out of his system. You can see the sensor battery pack by his leg below:

We were pretty sure that things went well since the only time the monitor buzzed at us was when either a) Patrick had pulled off, rubbed off, or otherwise removed one of the sensors, or b) the sensor battery was nearly dead. Yay for no “events”.

Today we saw Beth Rumack at the new Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH) clinic {St. Joseph’s and PCH merged, so the pediatric clinics moved to the children’s hospital}. The new facilities seemed nice and very colorful–but it sounds like we won’t need to spend much time there anyway. Patrick’s echo looked good. His right atrium is still enlarged, but it hasn’t gotten enlarger. His tricuspid valve is still leaky, but it always will be. If things continue this way, Patrick may not even need another heart catheter until young adulthood. We will keep seeing a cardiologist once every 4-5 months for now, but only 2-3 times a year will be SO nice. We are pleased with how well our little P is doing and very glad that he had the surgery when he did.

Stats:

Weight: 8.8 kg (19 lbs 6oz) – 30th percentile

Height: 2.5 feet – 50th percentile

Head Size: 90th percentile!!!

And that’s why they call him Mega Head (or at least Aunt Aubrey does).

We are told that his proportions will start to even out eventually–the Glenn procedure is still playing a large part in the crazy growth curve his head size is on. Credit for that is also due to his genetic inheritance (Patrick says, “thank you, daddy!”)

All Roads Lead to Nigro

Yesterday I had a consultation with Dr. Jedeikin from the Arizona Pediatric Cardiology group (affiliated with the Phoenix Children’s Hospital) for a second opinion/option kind of thing. We were tempted to cancel the appointment because we feel so good about the St. Joe’s group, but we decided that we should see what Dr. Jedeikin  had to say. You know, due diligence and everything.

Dr. Jedeikin seems really great. (And I’m not just saying that because I like his South African accent…) He is very, very passionate about hearts and cardiology. He did a fetal echo and went over Ebstein’s Anomaly with me again. I always learn new things about the heart, and I came away in awe of all of the many facets of a human heart–how do all of those parts work perfectly in most people?!

Dr. Jedeikin’s assessment and approach to Pedro’s case is pretty much the same as those we’ve heard from the other doctors involved. He hopes that immediate surgery will not be necessary, and has pretty much the same plan for monitoring our little guy’s heart–both pre and post delivery. He had good things to say about the Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH), but apparently he could work with us even if we choose St. Joe’s for delivery. He encouraged me to deliver at St. Joe’s since that is where my new OB delivers (rather than switch OB’s again in order to deliver at the hospital near PCH). From this I concluded that both hospitals are a good choice, and we just need to pick the one that we feel most comfortable with. They both have Level 3 NICU’s.

Probably the most interesting/encouraging part of this consultation was that Dr. Jedeikin would involve Dr. Nigro for the surgery aspect. Dr. Nigro seems to be the go-to guy for surgery in these cases, regardless of which hospital we go to.

So, since:

  1. the hospitals are comparable
  2. we get Dr. Nigro either way
  3. the Pediatric Cardiologists are excellent either way

…we are free to choose the hospital and Pediatric Cardiologist(s)  that we feel the best about. We still appreciate that at St. Joe’s I would deliver and recover at the same hospital where Pedro would be in the NICU. We also feel like the program with the St. Joe’s cardiology group is a better fit for us–much more supportive and user-friendly. Also, once you meet Beth, the nurse practitioner, it’s a no-brainer. She is off-the-hook amazing.

Although it did not change our mind, I’m really glad I went to see Dr. Jedeikin. Now we can feel even more confident about our decisions, and I appreciated learning more about Pedro’s heart. Here are a few things I now understand after meeting with him:

  • The tricuspid valve is made up of three leaflets, one of them is the ‘Septal leaflet.’ Pedro’s septal leaflet is dysplastic–which means it is gnarly, thickened and crumply. The other two leaflets are doing all of the work to open and close the valve as best they can–which is why one of the leaflets is longer and floppier, it’s trying to cover the Septal leaflet’s territory too.
  • Dr. Jedeikin did not think that Pedro’s Septal Leaflet would be fixable because it is so dysplastic.
  • If surgery does become necessary, it is possible that they would move the leaflets closer together so that the functional leaflets can adequately close the valve with each heartbeat.
  • He didn’t go into all of the details, but if it becomes necessary to surgically re-route Pedro’s heart so that it operates with a single ventricle scenario (not preferable), there are a few different procedures:

Blalock-Tuassig Shunt

Starnes Procedure

Glenn Procedure

Fontan Procedure

{Pedro could need all, none, or some combination of the procedures. We have heard a little about these procedures before, but had not learned all of the names yet. I’ll activate hyperlinks if I find good descriptions for them.}

Oh and, Pedro’s new trick of the day was rolling. The sonnographer laughed with me this time when Pedro would roll away while they were trying to record his heart. Then he would roll back and punch the ultrasound wand. He definitely has a little personality already ♥