More Showering ☂

I work with seriously great people at ASU! Pedro will have a few adopted aunts to entertain once he’s here. In the meantime, they made use of Braden and I for entertainment with some hi-larious games/activities at a baby shower they threw for us last week.

Braden was able to get away from work for a couple of hours to join us on campus. As soon as he arrived, they had him put a balloon up his shirt…

Braden found some good uses for  his balloon baby:

Other  times, the belly seemed to impede him a bit…I wonder what that’s like? Must be so frustrating not to be able to reach things, etc…

At the end of the shower, Braden ‘gave birth’ to his balloon by popping it–inside was the answer to one of the door prize questions: “What was Braden’s birthweight?” The answer is 7 lbs. even. It is sort of looking like Pedro will surpass his father in that department–the little guy was already 4lbs. 9oz. last Friday! He could be over 5 lbs. by now with about 6-7 weeks left to go!

Besides fun parties, things have been going well otherwise, too. Pedro has passed each Biophysical Profile (BPP) and seems to be doing really well in spite of his heart issues. They have even scaled back and are only having me come in once a week, instead of twice. For BPP’s  they check 4 different criteria to see how he is doing overall: 1. Fetal Movement, 2. Fetal Breathing (aka oxygen flow to all the important parts), 3. Quantity of Amniotic Fluid, and 4. Fetal Heart Rate. If it were a graded test, and not just pass/fail, I wonder if they’d give him an A+ for movement. This kid rarely holds still!

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Ultrasound & Echo – 30 Weeks Pregnant

Pedro was nice to the ultrasound tech today and he even let her  take some images of his face! I think he liked her because she said nice things about his cuteness. Braden thinks that the tech was just sneaky/stealthy (read: she didn’t push very hard) and therefore Pedro did not detect anything to attack. Whatever the reason, we are happy to see his wee little mug:

And here is his weapon of mass destruction (my ribs cringe at the sight…)

The tech calculated his weight at 3lbs. 9 oz. Apparently that is more than a large jicama, but less than a pineapple (if you like to  think in terms of produce, and who doesn’t?) A pineapple is much cuter than a jicama, but I doubt either of them would be as good-looking as Pedro is going to be in his Angels gear and various duds from the grandmas and others. (thanks ♥)

Now about his heart.  Today they could see that the right side is significantly enlarged. The regurgitation of blood from the right ventricle back into the right atrium is causing the atrium to fill up and expand. While it is no surprise that this is happening–everyone had hoped it would be later in the pregnancy (or not at all, please!)

I *think* this next image shows the problem. I could be way off because we weren’t looking at anything in particular when the doctor told me about the enlarge-ness. But I believe these measurements of his heart show a large circle to capture the circumference of the whole heart, and a smaller circle around the right side of his heart:

We’re still crossing our fingers for a full term baby. Starting after my St. Joe’s ultrasound next week, I’ll go into the OB’s office twice a week so that they can keep a close watch.

In the meantime, it’s a really good sign that Pedro is so active and it should be easy to tell if his heart starts slowing him down. I’m not so sure that this little dude would let anything deter him from his regiment of kick-boxing and aqua aerobics, but I’ll notice if he does actually get quiet.

This last image is just one that I thought was interesting–it shows the blood flow to and from Pedro via the umbilical cord:

Help me OB-one

This morning I met my new OB, Dr. Blumrick and he is great—very personable and optimistic. Also, very chatty, which is nice in some respects. He set a goal for delivering Pedro after 39 weeks (so sometime after Sept. 9th would be ideal). Dr. Blumerick was pleased that Pedro’s Right Atrium is still the normal size, and besides the Right Ventricle, the other parts of the heart are all in the 50th percentile for size. So his heart overall is just the right size—not too big and not too small.

He also told me that when my former OB did bloodwork on June 10th to check for Gestational Diabetes (which I don’t have-yay!), my platelet count was at 140—so we are getting even closer to a normal range and rising. A small win, but a win nonetheless.

And what would a doctor’s visit be without an ultrasound?—so we did that again as well. Does this image look a little even more blurry than usual?

Yep. That’s because he refused to hold still. Pedro kept kicking and wiggling when he wasn’t supposed to–and wouldn’t budge when they needed him to move into a position that would make things more visible. Oi! We are in for it with this kid!

Dr. Solomon, a Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist, did part of the ultrasound. She explained more about hydrops: when the tricuspid valve is regurgitating blood, the leaked blood can sometimes pool up and cause fluid to be where it shouldn’t. If untreated long-term, this could cause heart failure. If untreated short-term, it could cause damage to the surrounding organs, most notably the lungs. We vote “no” on hydrops, and so far we have every reason to hope that we’ll get through the pregnancy without them developing.

Fetal Echo – 26 Weeks Pregnant

It has become an interesting mix of dread and excitement when I go to these appointments now. I still love, love, love to see my baby. The highlight of this particular visit was that Pedro had become quite the kicker (or elbow-er, headbutt-er, whatever he can throw at you-er). It was probably more entertaining for me than for the poor ultrasound technician when Pedro would kick the ultrasound wand. The kid’s got good aim!

Despite Pedro’s burst of activity, the technician and then Dr. Nyberg were able to see that the condition had progressed and our Pedrito was diagnosed (officially) with Ebstein’s Anomaly. By this point, his tricuspid valve was more obviously misshapen. As a result, it had become floppy and leaky. Apparently, blood is only supposed to be on a one-way track through the heart—in the right side of Pedro’s heart the blood is traveling in both directions.

The Fetal & Women’s Center has an amazing Doctor/Patient Care Coordinator, Susan, who worked with me via email to set up consultations with the cardio groups at both St. Joseph’s and the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. It will be important for us to deliver at a hospital with a NICU—even if Pedro doesn’t need surgery right away, he will definitely need to be monitored closely. Susan also sent me some information and arranged for me to transfer to the Center’s OB for my regular pregnancy visits. (My original OB does not have privileges at either of the hospitals with a NICU.)

Fetal Echo (Ultrasound) – 21 ½ Weeks Pregnant

Instead of having an ultrasound at my obstetrician’s office, the ultrasound people (aka the Fetal & Women’s Center of Arizona) had me come to their own office. We thought this would be another boring visit, so we didn’t bother scheduling it at a time that both of us could be there. Afterall, ultrasound technicians are not really allowed to tell you much, so I went solo to this appointment to let them examine Pedro’s “a little small” heart. The technician checked all the other anatomy again for good measure and she tried in vain to get a 4D image of his face for us, but Pedro was determined to thwart her plans—a scheme he must have inherited from his father. The photographer in me groaned for my future, but I couldn’t help but laugh at our funny little dude:

Blah, blah, blah she checked everything and then spent some time looking at, measuring, recording, and otherwise studying Pedro’s heart. We were right—she couldn’t tell me much. Imagine my surprise, though, when she stepped out to get “the doctor” so that he could look if he wanted. And he wanted.

Dr. David Nyberg was absolutely wonderful. He came in and did his own ultrasound to get a few more images. Pedro tried his best to move around at all the right (translation: wrong) times, but in spite of that Dr. Nyberg was able to see what he needed to. He explained as he went along that the valve on the right side of the baby’s heart seemed to be shaped a bit abnormally. Afterward, he had me come into his office to look at diagrams (from a ginormous book that he himself had co-authored).

Dr. Nyberg explained that the misshapen tricuspid valve in Pedro’s heart appeared to be similar to a congenital heart defect called Ebstein’s Anomaly.  He was quick to say that if it was indeed Ebstein’s, it was a super mild (okay, he didn’t say “super”) case of it—so much so that he was not even comfortable diagnosing it as Ebstein’s at that point. He recommended that we look at it again in few weeks to see how it would develop. He told me not to research Ebstein’s yet, because it would just scare me and would not be applicable to Pedro since his funky valve was only mildly funky.

I tried not to be scared—but they aren’t kidding about those pregnancy hormones!

We started praying more regularly for his heart to be strong, and it took me awhile not to chuckle when I would say, “…bless his heart…” in my prayers. I guess that comes from spending a lot of time in the South—which conditions a person to expect some kind of disparaging remark immediately after such a phrase. (i.e. Bless her heart…Jessica is a lot  of things, but coordinated is NOT one of them.)